Quick Film Guide: Black Dynamite (Scott Sanders, 2009)

Black Dynamite
Directed by Scott Sanders
USA

Black Dynamite is a former CIA-man turned kung-fu-fighting gangster, who wages a war against “the man” that takes him all the way to the White House – of Honky House – to avenge his brother’s death and protect his black neighborhood.

Scott Sanders’ film is more than a mere tribute to blaxploitation, though its devil-in-the detail care, 35mm photography and even its funky soundtrack flatter its tradition. It is also a modern black reclamation of this ’70s subgenre that, despite its cult appeal, was defined by a disproportionate stereotypical representation of black Americans.

All elements of Black Dynamite are deliberately familiar; the film is both a kickass action film and a hilarious parody. Characters, storyline and situations from various ’70s flicks are mashed up into a densely rich romp and turn to gold in the hands of Sanders and co-writers Byron Minns and Michael Jai White. The latter also stars in the film’s title role, arguably the most memorable of his career.

Written by Matt Micucci

I'm an international journalist, reporter, website editor and content creator. I actively work for JAZZIZ Magazine and FRED Film Radio, collaborate with other websites and curate my own projects, including IN ARTE MATT and CineCola. I have also curated and produced my series of films in Galway, Ireland, and photo exhibition and arts events in various European countries. I have a working class background and have and have a postgrad degree in Film Theory + a BA in Film & TV.

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